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© Niklas 'Tanis of TCB' Malmqvist

This is where you need to look if you want to get your hands on software that has been provided by us throughout the existence of ST NEWS. These are all Atari ST or Falcon titles. If they work on anything else (like an emulator) then you're lucky.

All Other Disk Magazines

Below you can download any third party disk magazine disk images you may be looking for (or at least that's the aim). If you have other disk magazine issues that are not here yet (in particular missing issues of the ones featured below), please send them to me. If you have technical issues with the downloads (downloading and mounting the images) do contact me, too. Once the disk imagines are mounted in an emulator, however, you enter the realm of figuring out which emulation configuration and TOS version to use. This is a process I'm afraid you're going to have to go at without my aid...
 

AAUSAC: A disk mag by the Association of Atari Users in Schools And Colleges. It was put together by a chap called Terry Freedman, and its aim was to bring together teachers and lecturers who used the Atari in their work.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes. An old version of the Newsdisk shell.
Latest know issue: Number 1.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

ACUSG: A disk magazine that came from a London Atari ST user group. At least 2 issues are known to have come out, but they probably ceased existing after Volume 1 Issue 2. Articles were tiny (displayed in dialog boxes, for crying out loud), and accent was put on programs that could be run from the shell. The last known issue (i.e. Volume 1 Issue 2) was released in June 1987.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes. A custom one that was, let's face it, bad.
Latest known issue: Volume 1 Issue 2.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

AMAZINE: A disk magazine that used to be made by the demo coders Mad Vision (who seem to be French, Belgian and English). User interface used to consist of a menu where you could type the number of the article you want to read. Later issues had a mouse-driven menu. Quality of English varies considerably depending on who authored a particular article. Loads of humour (BBS and internet-sourced material). Strictly Underground and probably fairly illegal. One of its earliest issues was reportedly sent to F.A.S.T. (the Federation Against Software Theft) by MicroMart. Very odd. In January 1993 Mad Vision left the ST scene and the magazine was supposed to be taken over by the Hemoroids, but wasn't (they switched to the Amiga).
Status: Public domain.
User interface: Yes. A custom one.
Latest known issue: Issue 4.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Complete!

ATARI DIGEST: These were messages and discussions taken off UseNet and consequently edited. It was primarily focused on American interests, and a treat for the technically interested. If you have a look at their 'latest issue', below, you will see it's a number that suffices to let you know how long they'd been going on and at which approximate frequency it appeared.
Status: Public Domain, on-line.
User interface: No.
Latest known issue: Last documented one is 206. Probably more.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

ATARI DREAM MACHINES: A magazine dedicated solely to Jaguar and Falcon. Editors are Timo Gietschel and Gilbert Koch, who filled it with interesting facts, though all in German. A text displayer was supplied, too, which enabled you to check the magazine (which is one huge text file). The text displayer used interlace on RGB, which kindof sucked. Contents made up for it, though.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Just a basic text displayer.
Latest known issue: Issue 6 (March 17th 1996).
Language: German.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

ATARI EXPLORER ONLINE: When, early 1992, a magazine called "Z-Net" started working together closely with the regular paper magazine "Atari Explorer", this on-line magazine was founded. Most of the "Z-Net" staff went to work for this mag afterwards. Around New Year 1992/1993 Ron Kovacs resumed publication of his "Z-Net". "Atari Explorer On-Line" went on with a new editor, Travis Guy.
This magazine was often referred to as 'AEO', and was released about twice per month (though it had been a bit slow during its last year or two) and contained lots of hot inside information as far as Atari was concerned. They also did special extra dedication issues. Sometimes they got very big with lots of information and renditions of entire Genie Roundtable Convention stuff. Quite incredible.
When you had a subscription to AEO, you automatically got the Atari Programmer's Journal, a somewhat more technical compendium sort of thing that was released once every few months or so. This also included UUencoded source material at times. Additionally you also got special Jaguar-related issues, "AEO News" issues and occasional occurrences of special "CES" issues.
One of the last Atari magazine strongholds, "AEO" ceased to be in spring of 1996.
Status: Public Domain, on-line.
User interface: No.
Latest known issue: Volume 4 Issue 9 (January 1st 1996); the Atari Programmer's Journal latest incarnation is issue 4 (March 31st 1994); the Jaguar Edition latest issue is #3 (May 20th 1995); the latest AEO News issue is #4 (June 18th 1994). The latest "CES" issue is "Summer CES 1994".
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

ATARIMAGASINET: This was a bi-monthly "ST Guide" hyper text disk magazine aimed primarily at the approximately 200 users of the "Atari Users of Norway". The first issue was released in December 1993, after which it appeared on paper four times. A year of pause then ensued due to editorial health problems. In spring of 1995 it arose again, now as a disk magazine. It was done by Stein Arne Jensen.
Status: Public domain.
User interface: None. You have to use "ST Guide".
Latest known issue: Issue 04/95, October 20th 1995 (the fourth on-disk issue).
Language: Norwegian.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

ATARIPHILE: A latecomer to the Atari world, and this time an HTML-based one on the World Wide Web. The first issue was released in early spring 1996.
Status: Public domain, Web site. Issues 2 and 3 can be found at http://www.stcarchiv.de/atariphile.php
User interface: Well, doesn't really apply, does it?
Latest known issue: Issue 3.
Language: English.
 

ATARI POWER ENTERTAINMENT ONLINE: This was an American monthly online addition to the "Atari Power Entertainment" magazine. It was about Lynx and Jaguars, and the first issue was released in April 1994.
Status: Public Domain, on-line.
User interface: No.
Latest known issue: Issue 3 (July 1994).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

ATARI TIMES: This was a British online disk magazine published in HTML format. It was edited by Colin Polonowski, started in 1996 and lasted for 15 issues incl. one “zero issue” which only contained information about Croft Software. Issue 0 to 3 were called “Croft Soft HTML Newsletter”. At the end of its life span, a special paper issue was published. Please note that there is still another web site called “Atari Times” which is unrelated to the UK one and more game orientated. The 15 regular issues can be seen at http://www.stcarchiv.de/ataritimes.php.
Status: Public Domain, on-line.
User interface: No.
Latest known issue: 15 (1998).
Language: English.
 

ATARI UNITED!: Or "AU!". A special preliminary issue was released through STeve's Software at the Glendale Atari Show in the US in September. It offered news, reviews, press releases, program demos, public domain software and any other information that might be of interest to owners of Atari TOS computers. It had a custom interface written by Bry Edewaard and Scott Ettinger. Compatible with any ST/TT/Falcon, using any 80-column resolution. Managing editor was Gordie Meyer. It explicitly permitted user groups to republish its material provided credits were given. Articles were extensive and well-written, and bonus archives containing ZIP archives filled with goodies were also to be found on the disks. All articles were in one file that is loaded on startup.
Status: Commercial (4 issues per year, US$ 4,95 a piece or US$ 16,00 a year).
User interface: Yes, a custom one that was quite smooth and entirely GEM-driven.
Latest known issue: Issue 2 (Winter 1994).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

ATARI UPDATE: A latecomer to the world of ST disk magazines, and perhaps a slightly superfluous one. Articles seemed uninspired and didn't cover a lot of new ground. The editor was David Pettifer. It is said that it merged with another magazine (which one?) after issue 1. A web version of issue 1 can be seen at http://www.stcarchiv.de/atariupdate.php.
Status: Public Domain (originally intended as shareware).
User interface: Yes, the "NEWSDISK" shell.
Latest known issue: Issue 1 (July 1994).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Complete!

ATARI YAMAHA USER (A.Y.U.): A bi-monthly specialist disk magazine for users of MIDI, filled with relevant MIDI information and software reviews. It was put together by one Graeme and it was supposed to be really excellent. Didn't have an own user interface, though - you read read the articles from the desktop of using a text file viewer.
Status: Licenceware (£2.50).
User interface: None.
Latest known issue: Issue 4.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

ATOS: A German HTML kind of disk magazine, of which the name stands for "Around TOS". It started in January 1995. Most issues can be found at http://www.stcarchiv.de/atos/download.html.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, a hypertext one.
Latest known issue: May 2000.
Language: German.
 

AUTO-MATION: A British (?) disk magazine that started late 1993. Initial impression had been quoted by a PD library to be "very good and worth a look". Never seen it myself.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Not known.
Latest known issue: Volume 1 Issue 1.
Language: Probably English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

BIG NIGHT OUT MAGAZINE: An English magazine, colour only, edited by Paul Bramwell of The Corruption Software Group. It contained lots of short articles, cute music and nice demos. The first issue was released in November 1991.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes. A custom one.
Latest known issue: Number 2.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Incomplete.

BITE: This was supposed to be the follow-up - or reincarnation if you will - of "ST Enthusiasts Newsletter", edited by Jake "Caledonia" Bain. It used the same shell and the contents are in the same approximate vein, though with more of an accent on stuff taken from the Internet and fewer editorial contributions. It was stocked solely by Caledonia PD Library, and they produced it too.
Status: Public Domain? Their PD disks cost £2.50.
User interface: Yes, the "STEN" one.
Latest known issue: Issue 1.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

BOMBA: A Hungarian disk magazine about which little is known other than that two of the people who later did "COMA" used to be in its editorial staff in 1992.
Status: Presumably Public Domain.
User interface: It probably had one.
Latest known issue: I guess they made one at least.
Language: Hungarian and/or English?
Archive status below: Missing.
 

CENTRAL ATARI INFORMATION NETWORK (CAIN) NEWSLETTER: Not a whole not is known about this one. It was the newsletter of the Cleveland Free-Net Atari Special Interest Group. It had the latest news of all Atari stuff, including Lynx and 8-bit.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: No. It's on-line.
Latest known issue: Volume 2 Issue 4 (April 1995).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

CIP ST: This was the magazine of a German user group, done by editor Ulrich Veigel. It started in March 1987. It was set up as an additional magazine for members of the "CIP" computerclub in Heilbronn, Germany. Accents lay on an extensive PD service, tips & tricks, news, ready-to-use programs and contact between readers. The last documented issue that got out was issue 4, of May 1988. The program had its own shell which consisted of a large program in which all articles were integrated. Article loading times, thus, were nonexistent. Loading the program took longer, obviously.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes. A custom one.
Latest known issue: Number 4.
Language: German.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

COMA: Like "BOMBA", a Hungarian disk magazine. It's not clear whether it was ST or Falcon or possibly even multi-format (including Amiga and PC). The first issue was released in September 1992, and it was made by at least two of the original "BOMBA" people.
Status: Probably Public Domain.
User interface: Probably has one.
Latest known issue: Volume 3 Issue 2 (7th issue in total).
Language: Hungarian and/or English?
Archive status below: Missing.
 

D.B.A. MAGAZINE:  A widespread, very popular Dutch disk magazine with a user interface akin "Maggie" (the new version). "DBA" had this kind of menu before "Maggie", they claim. Custom music, nice menu, smooth working, multiple musical pieces, good graphics, intuitive, OK. They write in English but one of the submenus is devoted to Dutch stuff which makes it stand out among the others. They tried doing monochrome versions back in the ST days, but they remained colour-only until they became Falcon-only. "DBA" released the first issue around October 1991. Issue 4 is a compilation of stuff that appeared in issue 1, 2, 3 and 5 (yes, strange chronology but true nonetheless). Issue 9 was the first attempt at Falcon compatibility and as of Issue 10 it's Falcon only (and supplied on a single HD disk). Issue 12 was, massive, supplied on two HD disks. It was a Magnetic Interlude co-operation with "Maggie" and "ST News". Issue 13 was a compilation of the best bits of issues 9 through 12.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: A smooth and nice-looking custom one.
Latest known issue (officially): Issue 14 (November 1995).
Language: English, with one submenu in Dutch.
Archive status below: Complete!

DIGITAL DISK: Multi-format (ST/Amiga/PC) magazine, proclaimed non-elitist (you don't have to be in a demo crew), offering coverage of topics such as Network News, Digital Art, 68000 tutorial, Software Reviews and, yes, short stories. All different formats had a core of the same articles with added platform-specific stuff. It also offered PD programs and music modules. It was distributed as "Magic Shadow Archiver" file, and its editor was Steve Hill. The first issue was released August 1993. As of issue 4 it was subscription-only, which would set you back £8 for 4 issues or £20 for 12.
Status: Public Domain before Issue 4, commercial after that.
User interface: A GEM interface.
Latest known issue: Christmas 1993. Another source claims "issue 5" (I am not sure which is the latest).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Incomplete.

DIGITAL GAMES DIGEST: A newsletter e-zine that concentrated on games reviews for all formats (including PC, ST, Amiga, handheld, consoles, etc.). Its editor was Dave Taylor.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: None.
Latest known issue: Unknown.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

DISCBOX: A disk mag that took a different approach to the concept, by showing the articles as "Degas" pictures through a slideshow program. Articles were extremely brief, and about 40-50 pics (i.e. screen pages) appeared in one issue. Lots of the screens were dedicated to ads for the people who put it out, which were the Prophecy P.D. Library folks. Colour only.
Status: Commercial.
User interface: No. Well, maybe 'yes' - a slideshow program.
Latest known issue: Not known.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

DISK MAGAZIN: A short-lived initiative by Timo Schmidt, who after that became one of the staff writers of "Maggie" for a while. "Disk Magazine" was published in German, and had a GEM user interface.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, a custom one.
Latest known issue: Issue 9?
Language: German.
Archive status below: Incomplete.

DISK MAGAZINE: Apparently there was a second disk magazine of this name, this time produced by none other than The CareBears (TCB). Considering the status of TCB it was apparently not what you'd expect.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, a custom one.
Latest known issue: Issue 1.
Language: English and another language (Swedish?).
Archive status below: Missing.
 

DISK SPACE: Though suffering from the odd bug in its STOS-written user interface, "Disk Space" was a promising disk magazine. Its editor was Jason Reucassel, who had nothing against publishing lots of fiction in his mag - good idea! It went through its sadly brief existence in 1991.
Status: Budgie UK Licenceware.
User interface: Yes. A custom one.
Latest known issue: Issue 2 (Christmas 1991).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.

DISK TIMES: Magazine made by the Universal Coders of Armada. A nice colourful custom shell loaded with music and a bunch of articles. The first one, 1.0, was released on 1 January 1992.
Status: Public domain.
User interface: Their own one, very colourful and quite flashy.
Last known issue: 1.5 (July 1992). Not known if this is actually the last one.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Incomplete.

DIZZY DISKZINE: This was not so much a regular disk magazine as a sort of disk-based (non-official) Dizzy Games helpline. The 'magazine' was updated once every couple of months and included all cheats and solutions to the Dizzy games ("Treasure Island Dizzy" and the other Dizzy Codemasters games). They were done by Chris M. Banham.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: None. Just text files.
Latest known issue: Not applicable. Latest 'version' unknown.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

D.N.T. PAPER: "DNT Paper" was a high-quality French disk magazine. It started off in July 1991 with a user interface that was quite slow and had a lot to improve upon. At that time it was published by Flips (Philippe Henrotte) and Pips of DNT Crew. The user interface started improving as of issue 3. Then, with issue 4, the magazine proclaimed its death. Issue 5 followed, however, and several issues after that as well. As of issue 7 it also worked on the Falcon, at which time the editorial staff changed and Nullos (Sylvain Langlade) took over. It worked only in colour resolutions.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, a custom one.
Latest known issue: Issue 7 (April 1994).
Language: French and English.
Archive status below: Complete!

EYE ON SCENE:  When "Massive Mag" folded, some of the members of the Admirables went on to do "Eye on Scene". It was a magazine aimed primarily at the ST/E, though there was also Falcon coverage. It worked on all systems, anyway. It was "different from the regular diskmag scene" and done by Tommi Koistinen, a.k.a. Nirvana of the Admirables. The first issue was released in December 1994.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: A custom one.
Latest known issue: Issue 2 (spring or summer 1995).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Complete!

FALCON MAGAZINE: A weekly but unfortunately rather short-lived disk magazine especially for the Falcon. The first issue came out on June 28th 1993. Its editor was Jos van Roosmalen. The first two issues were text files on disk, less than 50 Kb in size, and the rest of the disk was filled with various source material and programs. It is a shame that this magazine ceased to exist so quickly, because it was a most excellent way to get the best from your Falcon, even though it was written in Dutch. Issue 3 (mid July) saw the introduction of a GEM interface, which was "MultiTOS" compatible!
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: No, later yes.
Latest known issue: Issue 3.
Language: Dutch.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

FALCON UPDATE DIGITAL: A Falcon magazine that, as of issue 6, had a Falcon-specific shell that incorporated such nifty things as 256 colour FLI animation, picture display (GIF, TARGA, IFF and RAW), DSP-replayed modules, multiple text windows open, and compatibility with "NVDI", "MultiTOS", VGA, RGB and any TOS 4.xx. It wasn't as perfect as it sounds, but a good and sizeable magazine nonetheless. Needed 1 Mb to run, but also needed a hard drive!
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, an insanely hyper one.
Latest known issue: Issue 9 (mid 1995).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Incomplete.

F.A.S.T.E.R.: The magazine that started everything with regard to a neat user interface - one of the very earliest ST disk magazines, having started somewhere in the autumn of 1986. It was Canadian of origin, and started out bilingually with a set of English articles and their copies in French. Later issues were English only. They were the first disk magazine with a user interface, however they survived only a little over a year - probably because they were commercial, which tends to make things more complicated than they need be. The "F.A.S.T.E.R." user group lived on longer than the magazine.
Status: Commercial.
User interface: Yes. A custom one (the first one).
Latest known issue: Volume 2 Issue 5.
Language: Used to be French and English. Later issues were only in English.
Archive status below: Incomplete.

G.D.I.: A Spanish true multi-format (ST/Amiga/PC) magazine released by Grupo de Desarrollo Informatico, primarily written in Spanish, too, but with some articles in English. It worked on any ST/TT/Falcon, actually, including multi-tasking operating systems. It uses a kind of "hypertext" interface where you could click on indices causing sublists and, eventually, articles to be loaded. The first issue was released on March 12th 1994.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, a custom one.
Latest known issue: Issue 2.3 (the third issue).
Language: Spanish, with some wee bits of English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

GENIELAMP ATARI ST: This was the resource magazine covering the Genie (BBS system) ST RoundTable. It offered all information that could otherwise be found on Genie, comprising an enormous amount of up-to-date information. It was released monthly (on the first of each month) in ASCII format, but a special version was available for the TX2 reader software (featuring graphics). The first issue was published in June 1990. There have been a few months in its existence in which two issues have been released. It was published by T/TalkNET, and the editor was one Sheldon (previously Bruce Faulkner). There were "GEnieLamp" magazines covering Amiga, PC and MacIntosh as well.
Status: Public Domain, on-line.
User interface: No.
Latest known issue: Issue 84 (September 1995).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

HITDISK: A German disk magazine that lived from 1989 to 1991, distributed as text files. Probably, all issues can be found at http://www.stcarchiv.de/hitdisk.php.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: No.
Latest known issue: 1/1991.
Language: German.
 

HOW TO CODE: A virtually Falcon-specific coding magazine, really hot on the heels of the latest programming tricks with regard to DSP, MPEG playing, GIF display and all that stuff. Of limited appeal to the layman, of course, but all the more interesting for Those Who Are In The Know. The articles came in French and English. It had official distributors around the globe (it was shareware). It is done by Alexis Naibo and members of EKO, really famous French Falcon demo programmers.
Status: Shareware (cost 50 French Francs, the UK distributor asked £7.50).
User interface: A neat custom one. There's one for the Falcon and one GEM-friendly one that'll work as ACC or PRG.
Latest known issue: Issue 3 (summer 1995 or thereabouts).
Language: French and English.
Archive status below: Incomplete.

HP SOURCE: A disk magazine that (also) paid attention to STOS programming, the successor to "STOS Bits". It also paid attention to "GfA Basic" and assembler, and had a much neater user interface than its predecessor. The editor, Leon O'Reilly (of Reservoir Gods), decided to call it quits after issue 2 as he considered it wasn't perfect enough. Rumours had it that it was intended as sortof an undead "Maggie" but "Maggie" suddenly went undead all on its own so there.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, a custom one.
Latest known issue: Issue 2 (released at Ripped Off Convention, September 1992).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Complete!

ICTARI: According to an ad: "Are you an Atari programmer? It does not matter which language you use, whether it be STOS, assembler, C, or whatever takes your fancy, you need ICTARI, the Atari ST Programmer's Disk Magazine." Featured sources and ideas for novices and experts alike. An issue was released on every 15th of the month, which I think was quite a feat. The disk magazine was a publication of the "The ICTARI programmer's user group", which started in March 1993. Except for a small gap in 1993 - when the editor was changed - the mag was released regularly. The group's membership was free; all you paid was the postage for the issues that got sent to you, and send them the disks for it.
Status: Public Domain, sortof.
User interface: No. Just use the desktop or a text displayer.
Latest known issue: Issue 52 (Early 1998).
Health: Alive.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Complete!

INC MAGAZINE: A disk mag offered by the Incoders, a demo crew from Sweden. Made by a bunch of real enthusiasts, but once said (I quote) to have "the effect of a bunch of schoolkids leaping up and down" (source: "STEN" disk magazine roundup). It was going to be called A-CC Magazine, but then they changed their minds to Inc Magazine. Issue 1 was released on 17 December 1989. One of the writers, Mr. Cool, went on to "DBA Magazine" after "Inc Magazine" folded. The user interface allowed for pictures to be displayed in the text - very nice!
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, a custom one.
Latest known issue: Volume 2 Issue 8 (August 1990).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Complete!

INDY MAGAZINE: In mid 1994 this was the latest hot thing, presumably with monthly intent. Little is known about it, however, other than that it was released by a union of German crews calling themselves Independent (some 70 people in total, with some excellent graphics artists).
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Probably yes.
Latest known issue: Rumoured issue 4.
Language: Most likely to be German.
 

INSIDE INFO: A bi-monthly disk magazine published by the New South Wales section of "ACE" (Atari Computer Enthusiasts). It was basically a magazine for members, so it included meeting minutes and stuff like that. Looked OK, especially if you want to stay in touch with down under. Had a good user interface, but you had to wade through a bit too much before you could get down to the actual reading.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, the "Infodisk" shell.
Latest known issue: Issue 76 (summer 1995).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Incomplete.

INTERACTION: This magazine is best described by quoting a bit from it: "As a first issue, this is an experimental and reduced version of what Intercation aims to be. Computers are everywhere, and so is art, but few are the time we see them in combination." And "Interaction" tried to be a collaboration between the two. It was also available for Amiga and PC, and used to be a paper magazine before it entered the digital realm.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, a fairly simple but effective plain text displayer shell.
Latest issue: Issue 1.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

INTERLEAVE: A rather excellent disk magazine with literary tendencies that, unfortunately, folded after two cult issues that appeared in 1991. Its editor was Tom Zunder, who filled the mag with "software, music, films and sex". What more would one want? Tom continued writing for "STEN" and "ST NEWS" for a while after the demise of "Interleave", but was lost to the world of Atari afterwards.
Status: Licenceware.
User interface: The S.A.N.D. shell.
Latest known issue: Number 2.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Sadly entirely missing :-(
 

JAG!: This was an on-line Jaguar-dedicated magazine in German. I am not sure when it started exactly, but probably around the end of 1993 or in January 1994. Half of it was about Jaguar game reviews and all kinds of interesting stuff, the other half consisted of advertisements. It was released every two weeks, and its editor was Carsten Nipkow.
Status: Publis Domain, on-line.
User interface: None.
Latest known issue: 3/94 (February 1994).
Language: German.
 

LAVARUSH: Unfortunately not much is known about this disk magazine, as it only appeared in about half an ad in the long defunct English "Zero" magazine), of which this is the text: "Lavarush, new ST diskzine for everyone with computer reviews, features, music, films,"...  And, indeed, that's where it stopped. More info seriously needed
Archive status below: Missing.
 

LEDGERS: This was the demo group "Untouchables" disk magazine. It was very enthusiastic and full of humour (and indeed, seemed to consist primarily of it). Featured short articles, but many of them. One of the better and definitely one of the most zany disk magazines around. Their user interface used to be a GEM pull-down menu but later became a mega-demo-like playfield with selectable bunches of articles as opposed to demo screens. The editor and chief coder was Matt Sullivan. Neat intros. Colour only. They seemed to appear about monthly, which was quite a feat!
Status: Used to be licenceware, but shareware as of issue 9. Cost £3.
User interface: Yes. A fully custom one. It differed per issue.
Latest known issue: Issue 13 (September 1992).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Complete!

(DISK) MAGGIE: Having started in June 1990, "Maggie" (or "Disk Maggie") quickly became one of the very best ST disk magazines. It was initiated by the British Lost Boys and at the time almost entirely written by Michael "Sammy Joe" Schussler (a German expatriot living in England). As of issue 8, when Michael joined the Delta Force, they became unbelievably much better, with a totally slick menu, much better music, picture and a fast page viewer. A quality turnpoint came in 1993 when, with the release of issue 11, "Maggie" turned out to have been taken over by some British guys lead by the editor, Chris "CIH" Holland. All the good bits previously present were now complemented with much better writing, a healthy dose of enthusiasm and, lacking completely before that, wit. It also worked on the Falcon, though with the lustrum issue of August 1995 (issue 18) they started releasing separate disks for ST (with the old shell and ST goodies) and Falcon (HD disk with fancy mod, more colours and Falcon goodies). The Falcon shell was coded by the talented Reservoir Gods. "Maggie" tried (though failed) to be bi-monthly. Remarkably, it worked on colour as well as monochrome screens. After Issue 16, a special "Maggie's Guide to Classic Consoles" issue was released. Although done with the "Maggie" ST shell (kind thanks to Chris), it has nothing further to do with "Maggie" at all, and was done by Reservoir Gods. Nice for old console freaks, though (as in Colecovision, Vectrex, Atari 2600 and the like).
Status: Licenceware (up to and including issue 10), Public  Domain (later issues).
User interface: Yes. Crap up to 7, after that really nice and custom. Seperate user interfaces for ST and Falcon as of issue 18.
Latest known issue: Number 30 (January 2016).
Language: Previously (<issue 11) English with some German, afterwards only English.
Archive status below: Complete (there was never an issue 6)!

MAGNUM: A Polish disk magazine made by the group Illusions (or Warriors of Darkness; maybe they have several names). The first issue, "0" promotion issue, was released around May/June of 1992. Its articles were rather short and few, displayed in 40-column mode. Only colour monitors were supported. It had a custom user interface where the cursor keys lead you through the various options and the space bar selected them. You had several menu screens. The music was in tracker .MOD format, and was quite excellent. There were several modules in each issue.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: A custom one.
Latest known issue: Issue 3 (fourth issue, November/December 1992)
Language: Polish.
 

MASSIVE MAG: A Finnish disk magazine with a demo'n'hacking atmosphere. Nice music (some of it ripped), nice demos, nice graphics. Quite a lot of stuff was offered, among which also quite a load of articles. The editor was Claff Moron of the Admirables. It died around the middle of 1994.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes. A custom one.
Latest known issue: Number 4. Issue 5 was made but never released.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Complete!

MAST NEWSDISK: In 1988, ex-US distributor of "ST NEWS" David Meile started his own disk magazine with the MAST user group ("MAST" was "Massuchusetts Atari ST" user group). It was called "MAST Newsdisk", of which only two issues are known to have been released (the last one in April 1988). It used the "Newsdisk" shell program. After this magazine sortof ceased, David was rumoured to have got married and was consequently lost to the world of Atari.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes. The "Newsdisk" shell.
Latest known issue: Number 2.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

MEGA DISCZINE: Disk magazine made by the talented Chris Swinson. At least four issues were made from 1997 to the very end of 1999, at least the final three of these being 2 disks in size. Jampacked with articles and cool demos to ogle at.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: The Revenge Doc Displayer.
Latest known issue: Issue 4 (December 1999).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Possibly complete!

NEWS CHANNEL: A fellow Dutch disk magazine that arose somewhere in 1987 and survived a bit over 1 year. Somewhat notorious for its mainly polemic battle with ST NEWS. For a while, some of the people behind "News Channel" seemed to be getting back in the picture with "STabloid".
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes. A custom one.
Latest known issue: Volume 2 Issue 1.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

NOVA: "Nova" was an Atari ST disk magazine, non-profit, released for the first time around spring of 1994. It was dedicated to "Trekkies", i.e. fans of the "Star Trek" films/series and associated things. The editor was James Bird.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Unknown.
Latest known issue: Issue 8.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

ON-DISK: A British disk magazine by Paul Wilson. Last known issue was number 3, which appeared spring 1988. The program had quite an unintuitive and buggy user interface, but the editorial contents were OK.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes. A custom one.
Latest known issue: Not certain, but probably number 3.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

POWER DISK MAGAZINE: Started as a monthly (!) shareware disk magazine run by James L. Mathews (who was very young, 13 at the start of the magazine early 1993). It used a STOS-based shell and will work on any TOS 1.xx, though not on that of the Falcon. Initially it had a lot (like, 100) articles that were very small (like, 3.5 Kb on average), but articles were getting less and longer. As of issue 23, texts are stored compressed and the user interface had been overhauled. As of that issue, mono compatibility was provided, though Falcon compatibility still seemed a long way off. Around issue 25 it became bi-monthly.
It has changed status a few times and ended as shareware. Registering would award you with a password that would give access to competition entry, bonus prizes and discounts at Power PD.
Status: Public Domain from issues 1 to 7. Power Licenceware from issues 8 to 15 (cost £2.50 per issue including disk and p&p). Shareware as of issue 16 of May 1994 (£1 to £1.50 registration fee to cover running costs).
User interface: Yes, an OK but rather slow STOS one.
Latest known issue: Issue 26 (May 1995).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

PURE BOLLOCKS: A strictly underground magazine, with rather controversial content. Articles are peppered with obscenities (and the demos with naughty piccies), and it was very coder-oriented. Among others, this magazine featured "how to" articles on cracking digital locks, hacking answer phones and American Pirate BBS phone numbers. Lots of it came from various sources "on the net". It's Scottish, and started with Issue 21, January 17th 1993.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, a very flashy smooth one. Very original.
Latest known issue: Issue 23 (September 18th 1993).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Complete (they started with issue 21)!

QUAST: A Polish disk magazine put together by the Quast group, in Poland. Nothing much is known about it, other than that it existed.
Status: Not known.
User interface: Not known.
Latest known issue: Not known, but one should guess at least 1.
Language: Not known.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

RTS TRACKS: A smooth-looking disk magazine from the Netherlands. The first three issues (all released in 1992) were in Dutch, but after that it switched to English. Like "Maggie" and "DBA" it's fairly demo-oriented, although the crew that made it stressed not to be a demo crew. This was possibly caused by the main menu appearance: A bit like a megademo but still managable. About 40 were present in Volume 2 Issue 1, some of which contained graphics as well (medium resolution text with low resolution pictures - pretty slick!). Issue 2.1 came on two disks, the second one containing a load of shareware utilities also written by RTS, the crew that released the magazine. The editor was Ferdy Blaset. The 2.1 program was not fully Falcon compatible but you could get access to everything but the intro. After Volume 2 Issue 1 the editor's ST broke down and lack of funds and support for "RTS Tracks" caused the magazine to cease publication.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, quite an excellent one.
Latest known issue: Volume 2 Issue 1.
Language: Used to be Dutch (Volume 1), after that English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

SCRIBA COMMUNIS RESPONSI: This magazine is somewhat unique among ST disk magazines insofar that it is slightly crazy, slightly religious (though it has nothing whatsoever to do with Christianity or any other regular religion) and slightly absurd. It used to revolve around an assumed religion involving a Number. Lots of stuff about girls and absurd bits about Everything about Life and the Universe. Main writers were Gard Eggesbø Abrahamsen (RIP) and Kai Holst - the former was also editor. Old versions worked on colour monitors only, but start '93 all older issues were also released with a monochrome-and-colour-interface. Specifically Falcon-compatible, something of which they're exceedingly proud. It probably has one of the most user-friendly interfaces seen anywhere.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, a very neat custom one that doesn't change every other issue.
Latest known issue: Volume 2 Issue 2 (November 11th 1993).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Complete!

SIENARA ONLINE: German disk magazine, Falcon only, using a hi-res VGA displayer. Nothing more is known, really.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, a custom one,
Latest known issue: Issue 1, at least.
Language: German.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

SKYNET TIMES: A fairly late addition to the disk magazine world edited by Jonny Notts and Richard Davies (a.k.a. Vogue and Requiem), and quite good while it lasted (though it borrowed quite a lot of stuff from Internet sources up to and including issue 6). Started out using the T.O.M.S. shell, but had plans to design one themselves later. It was released once a month, and was originally a newsletter kind of text in "Power" disk magazine.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes. No custom one, although plans existed.
Latest known issue: Issue 7 (September 1 1995).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Incomplete.

STABLOID: Fabulous-looking disk magazine made in Holland by Sewersoft and Galtan Six. Very inspired, but never became available with exception of one preview issue released at the 1991 Atari Messe (or the month after?). Seemed to be the only serious competition for the new type of "Maggie" at the time.
Status: Intended to be commercial, even though the preview issue was Public Domain.
User interface: Yes. A custom one that's rather brilliant.
Latest known issue: The preview one.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Complete!

STANZINE: Was to be called "ST World" but then wasn't. Its aim was humorous coverage of the ST and other things. It cost £1.50 (or £1.00 if you sent your own disk). The editor was Martin Betts. Only one issue seems to have been released.
Status: Commercial.
User interface: Yes. The S.A.N.D. shell.
Latest known issue: Not known, probably 1.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

ST APPLICATIONS: Not to be mistaken with the British "ST Club" 'regular' magazine nor its 'disk version' (which is actually a collection of PD utilities on disk), this is an American effort. Offered loads of programs with it.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Not known.
Latest known issue: Volume 1 Issue 7
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

STATUS: This was a pretty flashy low-res-only effort from the United States. They offered high quality tips & tricks. The first (and only?) issue was released in 1989.
Status: Commercial.
User interface: None.
Latest known issue: Not known. Might be Volume 1 Issue 1.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Maybe complete!

ST BEERMAT: A latecomer in the ST disk magazine scene, but certainly impressive. Editor Kev Davis showed us that there was more than just "Maggie" (well, at least sortof). The interface looked slick and the writing style was witty and personal.
Status: Shareware (£1).
User interface: Yes, a custom one.
Latest known issue: Issue 1 (July 24th 1994).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Complete!

ST CONTACT: A nice disk magazine, and a monthly one at that. The main menu and page viewer were not the epitome of perfection - and programmed in "STOS" - but they worked and showed everything at a glance. The editor was Derek Payne.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, a custom one.
Latest known issue: Issue 11 (September 1994).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

ST DIGITAL: Quite an excellent disk magazine, but unfortunately written only in German. Its editor and programmer, Christian Geltenpoth, surely was one hell of a talented chap. In 1989, his shell already offered pictures within the text and all that. It only worked on old TOS versions and monochrome monitors.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, a rather nifty custom one.
Latest known issue: Probably issue 8.
Language: German.
Archive status below: Incomplete.

STEK: A Polish disk magazine made by a group of the same name. Reportedly very good, with full-screen overscan with text in medium res and graphics in low. Probably colour only. Used "Noisetracker" music on STE.
Status: Unknown.
User interface: Unknown, but probably a custom one.
Latest known issue: They made at least one.
Language: Unknown, probably Polish.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

STELLAR: A magazine written by Mark Nobes using the "TOMS" shell, which worked on all Atari systems including the Falcon. The user interface used not to be one of the best, quite limited and slow, but improved over time. The first issue was released on January 1st 1994, after which the magazine stayed monthly until issue 14. As of issue 15 it's bi-monthly. Three issues were released as early as 1992, but these didn't do well. "Stellar" has as aim to review Public Domain software and PD libraries. Colour only.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes. A custom one written in STOS.
Latest known issue: Issue 16 (August/September 1995).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Incomplete.

STENCH: A Norwegian disk magazine that used the SANDP shareware disk magazine shell. It was fairly basic insofar that they still explained some material in their articles that most people should already know. Unfortunately, it was in Norwegian so it could not be advised as a general easy mag for beginners all over the world. The first issue was released on March 5th 1992.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes. The SANDP shell.
Latest known issue: Number 3 (October 25th 1992).
Language: Norwegian.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

ST ENTHUSIASTS (STEN) NEWSLETTER: Used to be one of the very best quality disk magazines around, from editors Dave Mooney and John Weller. They started at issue 0. A good and serious disk magazine with in-depth material, even though it was slanted ever so slightly towards British interests.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes. A custom one.
Latest known issue: Number 15 (late November 1993).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Probably incomplete.

STESTOSTERONE: Description due soon-ish.

ST INFO (NL): This mag appeared from Holland in 1987 and 1988, initiated by Chun Wing Lai from The Hague. It was a good magazine, but did not have a user interface and basically consisted of a large "1st Word Plus" file. Was supposed to fold and re-emerge in "ST Bulletin" (with user interface), which unfortunately never happened.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: No.
Latest known issue: Not known.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

ST INFO (UK): Only one issue was every released, as far as I know, created by The Enigma with assistance of The Tinman. This entire issue was filled solely with adventure solutions, released in March 1995.
Status: Public domain.
User interface: A custom one, compatible with any STf/m/e.
Latest known issue: Number 0 (March 1995).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Complete!

ST KLUBBEN: This magazine was started in 1988. It was initiated by the infamous Nutty Norwegians. It was almost an exact ST News clone, founded by ex-editor Ronny Hatlemark. It was also a bit of a mag for members of "ST Klubben" (a Norwegian ST club - it is Norwegian for "The ST Club"), but a good one. It was later taken over by Torbjørn "Lord HackBear" Ose and his apprentice, Karl-Anders "Wizzcat" Øygard, when Ronny had to perform national military service. After the fourth issue, early 1991, it ceased to be.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes. A good one.
Latest known issue: Fourth (early 1991).
Language: Norwegian.
Archive status below: Complete!

STOP: This was a German-based magazine of a "GfA Basic" users' group. Other than that, nothing is known about it.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Not known.
Latest known issue: Not known.
Language: German and English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

STOS BITS: A disk magazine aimed at the "STOS" programmer. It didn't have a very fancy user interface, was written in English and after the first issue continued life as "HP Source". This only issue was released in February 1991.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, a custom one.
Latest known issue: Issue 1.
Language: English?
Archive status below: Complete!

STOS GIGA-ZINE: There were quite a few disk magazines with shells programmed in "STOS" and aimed at "STOS" users. This was another one, and a one-off attempt at that. Said to be really good, actually, even though the shell would probably not work on several later Atari systems.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, a custom one.
Latest known issue: Issue 1.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

STOSSER: A disk magazine that served the fraternity known as "STOS" programmers (the "games basic"). It also featured reviews of the latest games and such. Each issue usually had some sort of "theme" with graphics adapted accordingly, quite an enormous amount of work. The user interface was quite nice, and it was monthly. The founder and ex-editor is was called Keefy. The user interface was programmed in "STOS" and we all know what that means...not compatible with Falcon or any TOS over 1.xx, and it didn't work on monochrome either. It was quite good, though (both the user interface and the actual magazine). Keefy wielded the editorial sceptre from the first issue (released April 20th 1993) up to and including issue 18. As of issue 19, the editorial duties were taken over by Bob Goodfellow. He took it as far as issue 23, when he suddenly never got heard of again. Dean "Deano" Sharples took over in August 1995, and continued until the end. A compilation issue of "STOSSER" was also released.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, and a nice one too!
Latest known issue: Issue 29 (March 1997).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Complete!

ST PLUG: This one originated from Canada. Editor: Dan Panke. The last issues were licenceware; at least up to issue 7 they were Public Domain. In North America they were allowed to be distributed by User Groups by purchasing "ST Plug" disk labels for US$ 2 a piece. User interface allowed pics to be shown through imbedded commands in the text. Offered many programs on disk.
Status: Licenceware.
User interface: A custom one called "Peruser".
Latest known issue: At least 15 (October 1990).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Incomplete.

ST PLUS (ST+):  Nice disk magazine made in Britain, a monthly effort. Its editor was Dave Hollis. The articles were offered in HTML format and could be viewed using the CAB program, also on the disk. It wasn't the fastest user interface you'd ever seen, and it was a bit spartan, but it worked. Articles were, generally, short and varied. In Isue 24 they announced they were moving towards paper, abandoning the disk mag format.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Well, sortof, an HTML browser.
Latest known issue: Issue 24.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Complete!

ST PROGRAMMER: This magazine, written by editors Terry Mancey and Richard Gale, was aimed at the ST programming fraternity. Although one would not find the hottest demo tricks here, it did offer lots of useful information for the layman and averagely experienced programmer. The mag even featured some of the editors' own programming output, like games and the like. Only worked in colour and with TOS 1.00, which was probably due to it having been coded in STOS.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes. A STOS one.
Latest known issue: Three.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

STRAIGHT UP: A German disk magazine that seems only to have seen one issue, published in September 1992. This issue can be found at http://www.stcarchiv.de/straightup.php.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Unknown.
Latest Known issue: 09/1992.
Language: German.

 

ST REPORT: A USA-based on-line magazine. One issue was made per week (just about). It was founded in 1987, and its editor was Ralph F. Mariano. They offered a wide variety of news, also with regard to other Atari computers (such as Falcon and, indeed, the Lynx). It was the primary advertising vehicle for its editor's ABCO Mail Order Company.
Status: Public Domain, on-line.
User interface: No.
Latest known issue: Volume 10 Issue 34 (it's not clear which volumes fit to which year, though, as Volume 9 was started in 1993 even though the magazine then only entered its sixth year of publication. Anyway, Volume 10 Issue 34 was released on August 19th 1994).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

ST SIG (ST SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP): Quoted to be "the first US disk-based magazine for the ST", which it might arguably be. Nothing much is known about this as it was only mentioned in a PD disk catalog.
Status: Probably Public Domain.
User interface: Not known.
Latest known issue: At least Volume 1 Issue 3.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

STUFF: A more recent disk magazine that appeared early 1994. No hands-on experience, but a review about it said that it had a nice atmosphere and the writers are enthusiastic Atari people. It worked on the Falcon too, but only in high resolution. Issue 1 was the pilot issue, which had yet to grow in the article department.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, an OK one with 3D dialog boxes and pop-up menus.
Latest known issue: Issue 1.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

STUFFED: The disk magazine by Steve Delaney's "Floppyshop". A rather nice one, based around a picture of a desk top where clicking on relevant items resulted in the loading of submenus from which articles could be selected. Pictures could be loaded with the articles, which was altogether a good thing. It only worked on colour.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes.
Latest known issue: At least 8.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

STUNN: This was the "ST UNemployed Newsletter", which was principally free if you join the group (which cost £1). The magazine was quite slow and didn't offer lots of articles, but the user interface constantly played some digi music and all docs were loaded at booting. It was founded in 1989, but in 1992 it switched to PC, called "PC STUNN". Editor David Burns was supposed to do another ST-centric disk mag called "ST Age" but that sadly never got off the ground.
Status: Public Domain (sortof).
User interface: Yes. The ST-Zine shell.
Latest known issue: Number 15.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Incomplete.

ST XPRESS: An American disk magazine that offered lots of Public Domain software. It was made by Rich Decowski, editor of the regular American magazine "ST XPress". Its custom shell could de-ARC programs and was quite OK.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes. A custom one called "Diskmate".
Latest known issue: Volume 2 Issue 7.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

SUOMENKILIESET TIETO-SANOMAT: No idea what the name means, though Google translate knows "Suomenkilieset" means "Finnish People". It started way back in December 1986 and seems to be one of the oldest Atari disk magazines, though the current editor also once claimed it didn't start until 1989. Its user interface used hypertext links and all that kind of fancy stuff so basically the user interface was like "ST Guide". Unfortunately it was in Finnish which kinda limited interest to people abroad. The shell was programmed by Seppo Loisa and the editor was Lasse Sundström. Like "ST Clubben" it was basically a disk magazine for an ST Club (ST-klubi ry). It was released quarterly, though 1994 had only seen one issue.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes, a custom GEM one with a Hypertext system.
Latest known issue: The late summer 1995 issue.
Language: Finnish.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

SYNTAX: A semi-commercial disk magazine for adventurers. It had a user interface written in "STOS" and it was multi-format (also on Amiga and PC). It was published every other month, ever since it started in July 1989. It also had a very large adventure-related library. The magazine itself offered hints, maps, solutions, interviews as well as a lively letters section. The editor was Sue Medley. Although it was coded in "STOS", it was claimed to work on all systems including the Falcon.
Status: Semi-commercial (cost £3.50 per issue or £20.00 per year).
User interface: Yes, a custom "STOS" one.
Latest known issue: Issue 38 (September 1995).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

THE THIRD DIMENSION: This was a multi-format monthly disk magazine for ST, PC and Amiga. It was a gathering of ASCII text files (about a dozen or more) with various sound files, pictures and machine- specific programs thrown in. Its editor was Tony Hartley. It was monthly, and aimed primarily at people who were into the "3D Construction Kit" 1 and 2, and Virtual Reality.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: No.
Latest known issue: Issue 27 (August 1996).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Incomplete.

TOPOLOGICAL INTERESTS: Interesting magazine done by John Cove. Unfortunately stopped after one issue.
Status: Public domain.
User interface: Not known.
Latest known issue: Number 1 (October 1995).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Complete!

TOXIC MAGAZINE: A disk magazine from France that supports both the English and French languages. The user interface loads the articles upon start-up, reducing loading times to nill. The first issue was released in 1991.
Status: Public domain.
User interface: A custom one.
Latest known issue: Number 18.
Language: French and English.
Archive status below: Complete!

UNDERCOVER MAGAZINE: A magazine from Germany that was done by Moondog  (Eric Henschler) of the TNB Crew (The Naughty Bytes) and of which the user interface was perhaps a bit too blatant a "DBA Magazine" rip-off. The first issue was released on October 1st 1993. Separate versions of the shell existed for ST and Falcon. The magazine was entirely in German with a few articles in English, at least up to issue 4, at which time they were also thinking of doing an English parallel kind of thing. It was thought to have died around issue 5, but then it became "undead" as it were.
Status: Public domain.
User interface: Yes, a custom one.
Latest known issue: Issue 25.
Language: German.
Archive status below: Complete!

THE VOICE: Quite an OK Polish disk magazine, colour only, made by the Team From The East (TFTE). All texts were loaded upon booting, so loading during reading was non-existent. All texts, unfortunately, were in Polish. The first issue was released in 1991, but wasn't particularly good - low res only, no music and bad articles (these are their own words!). Issue 2 was already better, using medium res, Mad Max music and a mouse-controlled user interface. Issue 3 was claimed by them to be a "small step for a people, a giant leap for a mankind" (?!) - both medium and low resolution on screen simultaneously, no lower border, scroller, and TCB tracker music. The interface was further improved until, with issue 7, it ceased publication.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes. A custom one that constantly got better.
Latest known issue: Issue 7.
Language: Polish.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

THE VOICE OF QUAST: A disk magazine published by the biggest Polish user group, "Quast Club" with over 100 members. The first issue was released in 1991. Topics varied from non-computing articles and education to reviews and party reports. No hands-on-experience.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes.
Latest known issue: Issue 6.
Language: Probably Polish.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

VOICES: This wasa multi-format disk magazine for ST, Amiga and PC. The ST version used the TOMS shell. Its editor was Dave Cobbledick of Dunces Cap Software, and it featured a mixture of non-run-of-the-mill computer topics and Internet borrowings. Interaction was one of its key driving forces.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes (TOMS).
Latest known issue: Issue 1.
Language: English.
Archive status below: Missing.
 

WARP: When Keefy (real name Kevin Dunn) stopped doing "STOSSER" he started doing a "Star Trek" kind of STOS-programmed shell disk magazine, the first issue of which was released in February 1995.. Not seen in person. It featured graphics in the text and a really neat shell. The first four issues were quarterly.
Status: Public Domain.
User interface: Yes (STOS one, so no Falcon compatibility). Each issue had a different one.
Latest known issue: Issue 5, "Warp Five" (April 1996).
Language: English.
Archive status below: Complete!